D-Day at 75: We must never forget

Print Article

Seventy-five years later, it remains difficult to comprehend the pivotal World War II military operation known as D-Day. It was an extraordinary feat that remains the largest military operation by sea and was the largest use of airborne troops up to that time. On this day, June 6, 2019, we honor those courageous men who fought so bravely as they stormed the beaches at Normandy in northern France in 1944, where enemy troops were well-armed and ready for battle, and we salute the paratroopers who jumped into dire circumstances behind enemy lines.

For those who may not know what the ďDĒ in D-Day stands for, itís not doomsday or destruction. The D simply means day; the designation was traditionally used for the date of any significant military invasion or operation, according to the National World War II Museum. But it was a day like no other.

D-Day is considered the most significant victory of the Western allies during World War II because it allowed the allies to ultimately defeat Germany. More than 150,000 soldiers from the United States, Canada and the United Kingdom came ashore on those beaches, and thousands perished.

Historians are still trying to determine the exact number of allied troops who died on D-Day. The estimates range from 5,000 to 12,000.

At an average age of 95 or older, there are few remaining D-Day survivors. Some are participating in commemorative D-Day anniversary events that have been taking place in France over the past several days. One 97-year-old veteran parachuted into Normandy, marking 75 years to the day of his first landing there in 1944.

The Associated Press published photos of D-Day veterans saluting as they posed with school children at the Normandy American Cemetery in France. There was a special poignancy as young children and old soldiers came together, and there was an urgency to pass on those memories and explain the significance of D-Day.

There will soon come a day when all of the witnesses of that fateful, bloody day will be gone. Their stories must live on with generations to come as an eternal reminder of the ultimate cost of war.

Print Article

Read More Editorial

Rebuilding Sperry is a marvel, even in modern times

August 22, 2019 at 5:00 am | Daily Inter Lake The logistics of rebuilding the Sperry Chalet dormitory on a stone bluff high up in Glacier National Park are perhaps not as daunting as they were when the original chalet opened in 1913. After all, ...

Comments

Read More

Boyle a fitting moniker for new Flathead gym

August 18, 2019 at 5:00 am | Daily Inter Lake Gene Boyleís legacy was long and deep in the Flathead Valley, and we canít think of a better person to commemorate in naming the new Flathead High School gymnasium. A formal request to name the gym ...

Comments

Read More

Lakeside park expansion will benefit all

August 15, 2019 at 5:00 am | Daily Inter Lake Philanthropy has benefited Flathead County communities in myriad ways, from improving our community college to building new sports complexes and performing arts centers. Our lives are richer here, th...

Comments

Read More

Past opioid use staggering, but correctable

August 11, 2019 at 5:00 am | Daily Inter Lake Most Americans are well aware of the opioid crisis fueled in past years by the rampant abuse of prescription painkillers. Itís been in the headlines again and again, and opioid addiction has been a h...

Comments

Read More

Contact Us

(406) 755-7000
727 East Idaho
Kalispell, MT 59901

©2019 Daily Inter Lake Terms of Use Privacy Policy
X
X