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Justices hear ‘doughnut’ case

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Posted: Friday, April 11, 2014 6:00 pm

MISSOULA — Montana Supreme Court justices peppered attorneys with questions Friday during a special hearing on the Whitefish “doughnut” jurisdiction battle as they considered key issues in the long-running conflict.

The high court heard oral arguments in a public venue Friday morning on the University of Montana campus. Only a select number of appeals — those with statewide significance — are chosen for oral arguments open to the public, a UM law professor pointed out to a large crowd that included dozens of Whitefish area residents as well as law-school students.

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